8 Do's for Thank You's

by Lisa Toner

You’ve opened and enjoyed your gifts. Now it’s time to thank Uncle Pete for the Silly String and Grandma for the sweater. Mom says you should write to thank them, but what will you say? If you feel stuck when it’s time to write thank-you notes, use these tips to get the ink flowing:

1. Send a thank-you note within a week of opening a gift or attending an event. If more than a week has passed, send a note anyway! It’s never too late to say thank you.

2. Write three or more sentences in your note.

3. Handwrite your thank you. E-mailing may be faster, but it’s much more personal to receive a handwritten letter in the mail. Your grandma might even save your note for many years.

4. When writing, be specific. Look at the following sentences. Which means more?
a. Thank you for the game. I like it.
b. Thank you for the amazing game. I’ve played it every day and can now beat Mom and Dad!

5. The following questions will help you be specific when writing your thank-you note:
a. How did receiving the gift make you feel?
b. What do you like best about it?

6. Use expressive adjectives when you describe the gift and the giver (words like awesome, one-of-a-kind, useful, generous, tasty or terrific). Express true gratitude!

7. When thanking someone for money, it’s best not to mention the amount but instead tell how you used (or plan to use) the money.

8. What if you don’t like the gift? Remember, the giver spent time and money to think of you and deserves to be thanked.

Thanks A Million!

Did you know you can write a thank-you note to God? No one else has given you a greater gift or deserves more thanks than He does. Try expressing your thoughts like David did in 1 Chronicles 29:11-13. But don’t feel like you have to use fancy language—just pour out your heart and thank God for something specific He’s done. In years ahead, you can look back at your note and remember the incredible ways God has worked in your life!

Copyright © 2009 by Lisa Toner. Used by permission. Artwork © woodleywonderworks/Flickr.com; used under Creative Commons license.